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of a potential vote that the united nations it is our view and the foreign secretary said this out yesterday in some detail, the palestinians should not take this to the un in the short term and we urged them not to do that. if they do so we will have to consider the right way to vote. in an end point is this. we will not solve this problem that the united nations. this problem will be solved by israelis and palestinians sitting at the negotiating table. there may be dangers from pushing the too early in terms of a cutoff of funds for the palestinian auority and oth consequences that could follow so in the end bets get negotiations going rather than discussions at the u.n.. >> if the prime minister wants to send a clear message to scotland and england belong together shouldn't he be doing his best to make sure the principal road from london is not going to come back? >> my friend makes a very attractive bid for the statement and the chancellor is not here but i'm sure other treasury colleagues have been listening closely. >> the prime minister claims universal credit will bring about the mos
opinion on the topic. at 3:00, the united nations security council is meeting today to discuss the situation with israel and hamas and the gaza strip. we will have that for you live. the conflict in israel and gaza came up today during prime minister's question time in london. >> can i start by going the prime minister in paying tribute to capt. area of the royal regiment of scotland? he showed the utmost courage and bravery and all of our thoughts and condolences are with his family and friends. can i also express my deep sorrow about the loss of life and suffering in israel and gaza in recent days, including the latest terrorist attack on a bus in tel aviv. there is widespread support on all sides of the house for immediate and durable ceasefire being agreed in israel and gaza. so what will the prime minister set out in his view what are the remaining barriers to this cease-fire agreement being reached? >> i agree with the gentlemen about the appalling news this morning about the terrorist attack on a bus in tel aviv. can i also express our concern for the people in southern
collins, but clearly it is her responsibility as an ambassador to the united nations to do much more than that. >> before anyone can make an intelligent and decision, we need to do a lot more. to this date, we do not have the fbi interviews of the survivors from after the attack. we do not have the basic information about what was said about the night of the attack as of this date. i remember the episode pretty well. our democratic friends felt like they did not have the information needed to make the alteration to make about john bolton. democrats dug in their heels and a they were not going to consider the nomination until they would get basic answers to their concerns. the concerns i have far greater today there and they were before and we are not even close to getting a basic cancer. >> i have many more questions that need answering. >> that was about 10 minutes ago after meeting with u.n. ambassador susan rice, mentioned as a possible replacement for outgoing secretary of state, hillary clinton. coming up, more discussion on the so-called fiscal cliff this timeless and a majority wit
. it was the security council under the charter of the united nations that put that pressure. of course we know that this system worked extremely well. it was 100% performance as a matter of fact. it's not bad for any u.n. organization to get the task and then i think it's probably the only one which succeeded to make it 100% performance. so the -- that means that both destruction capabilities and the monetary capabilities were forcefully placed. so everything looked shiny and fine until the u.s. government -- it was in spring of 1997, through madeline albright made the statement at george mason university, well, it looks like sanctions are -- disarmament is going well. if it goes well we can still not lift the sanctions which was a condition under the security council. sanctions -- so we can't lift the sanctions until saddam hussein is removed. so that came my obsession with the regime change. that, of course, destroyed in the sense the institution and operations. so i think that experience -- could havi annan led the group to see if they can re-establish something similar and this report of w
to the united nations. the un security council is set to meet on the situation in the middle east. this afternoon, israel and moscow agreed to a ceasefire which went into effect at 2:00 eastern this afternoon. looks like the security council meeting may be getting away momentarily and we will take you there live once it does. earlier this afternoon, and jesse jackson, representative from chicago, jesse jackson jr. submitted his resignation to speaker john boehner. nancy pelosi posted a statement saying it is of great sadness that we're learning of this decision. his service in congress is marked by as eloquent advocacy for his constituents abuse and his advocacy. that is from nancy pelosi and her statement on the resignation of jesse jackson jr. today. let's take you live now to the security council meeting at the united nations and the situation in the middle east, the conflict between israel and homospory this is a live look here on c- span. [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2012] ba >> and the 6000 -- a me
.n., that is the date of the so-called partition of palestine resolution, dating back to 1947 by united nations. that has symbolic meaning as well. and the israelis, not only the israelis have opposed it, but the united states has opposed it. and it will pass most likely because this is a general assembly issue not a security council issue. to but the united states -- -- they are trying to make a point by retaliating in some big way. that will have a cost for the palestinian authority. what does that mean? hamas will emerge as an even bigger winner. there will say, look at what he is getting you have got to vote, but what good did that to do? our way is the best day. get missiles. so that is the political dilemma for the united states. host: leila on our line for independents, go ahead. caller: my comment is, you always have to negotiate with people. when negotiated not only with friends, but with enemies. the enemies have to be [indiscernible] what we initially wanted to do when we sent the president oversees. -- once and for all. guest: hamas is delivering in gazgaza. my own position, just fo
citizen. a liver in -- live in new york and cover the united nations. that is how i look at it from a national approach. what everyone to think about is going on in the region now, everyone is looking at washington, what will the new president of the united states, the president of a second term, do about what he promised to do. what looked at the 3 obama promises. the first promise was when he said he would not find a solution. -- let's look at the 3 obama promises. second from a that the president of the united states was when he said the united states would never allow iran to be a nuclear power. this is unprecedented, where there are bright -- but the right or wrong. this is a statement made by the president more than once. this was the collection of promises made to the indian prime minister. how has president obama of filled the promise? is he going to absolutely implement this? and what are the israelis do we? from my point of view, one of the activated parts of the operation is that they are giving hamas a leading creating a new dynamic for shaping the new dynamics and shapi
after the united nations issued a report in 1969. there is a potential [indiscernible] we integrated the islands in 1895, about 220 years ago. for the first 75 years, we never received any claim from china. the un report changed their position and they started to claim the island. today, i don't want to get into the details. but i would like to point to the two elements. this is not an isolated issue. in the south china sea, china is trying to advance into the philippines and vietnam and other countries. they claimed the islands in the south china sea. in the east china sea, there is an issue with japan. in the japanese archipelago to taiwan, the philippines, [indiscernible] china ultimately expressed a strong interest in the maritime security and the territorial claim among those islands. this is a chinese maritime strategy. >> that is an important point. what you're basically saying is this is about power. china is clearly becoming more powerful. you are seeing lines challenged. i remember talking to george soros after he so-called broke the back -- broke the bank of england and he
misleading, but just to be clear, when you have a position where your and ambassador to the united nations, you go well beyond classified talking points in your daily responsibilities, and that is troubling to me as well, i am a person that got -- does not know anything about this and i am going on every single show. is part of our responsibility as an ambassador to the united nations to review much more than that. >> before anybody could make an intelligent decision about someone involved in benghazi, we need to do a lot more. we don't have to see the fbi interviews of the survivors to know that -- will have the basic information about what was said and shared in congress as of this day. i remember the episode very well. it did not have the information to make informed decisions about john bolton the ambassador, and democrats dug in their heels saying we are not going to vote or consider this nomination until we get basic answers to our concerns. all i can tell you is the concerns i had are greater today than they were before. we are not even close to getting the basic answers. >> i have
on third avenue near the united nations and something was happening city hall and john paraskivas one of my colleagues was asked to go down to city hall and file immediately but use this thing because this was the only way to file right away and it was something that was made by a company called leefax out of boston, some guys from and they were making scanning equipment to digitize negatives and take it back to wherever the printing presses were. but at any rate, john literally put on something that locked like a -- looked like scuba diving gear on his back. i kid you not. it was that big. it was a huge backpack and had a cable running into the camera. he transmitted that back to news day and made the paper and it was noisy as hell. it was a very grainy image, very messy image. it was not anything that you would see from film. but at any rate, that is the kind of stuff that people were dealing with 25 years ago. and when digital cameras first came out, i was one of the last who wanted one. >> exactly, i remember. >> because, because, because the images were very noisy, the cameras were ver
's chairmanship it will be the united states. there are only eight nations making up the arctic council, but the whole world is interested. china is interested in maritime commerce potential and the resources and the potential for a car rental catastrophes, which is very gigantic there as well. rescue missions, etc. what is the special burdens of canada and the united states with respect to the arctic council and should countries like china be allowed observance status? do think the next congress will ratify the treaty? if not, why not? >> the special burden, the role of the arctic council members, all of whom are democracies, one of the -- one of the underpinnings is a rules-based system. a respect for the rule of law. in addition to accountability to the people who elect you. canada has tremendous attachment and affection and over the largest part of the arctic. there are certain special obligations that come with that, stored ship of the environment. we have enormous interest in our own resources and our people. 40% of canadian land mass is above the 50th parallel, yet we only health
, and we have the united nations. something was happening at city hall. one of my colleagues was asked to go down to city hall and you would be able to file at right away. there were some guys from mit, they made scanning equipment-. ves.ati john put on something that looked like scuba diving gear on his back, and it was a huge backpack and there was a cable running into the camera, and he could only get one shot off of this thing. he transmitted that image back in tuesday and it made the paper, noisy as hell. very grainy, messy image. it was nothing that you would see from film. that is the kind of stuff people were dealing with 25 years ago, and when digital cameras first came out, i was one of the last that wanted one. because the images were very noisy, the cameras were very heavy, they were big and intrusive. michele has a bigger camera that is probably more had the normal, but this is the digital camera that will make a file probably as good as the camera right there. in my opinion, this will make a beautiful file, it would blow up alanis on a poster in times square and it gives
. margaret anderson was living her dream, working with her husband at mount rainier national park as a united states park ranger. her duties were not confined to patrolling, but ranged from supervision of snowplow areas to medical coordination and instruction for her fellow staff members. anderson was described by her colleagues as a candid and honest co-worker who could always bring a smile to your face. on new year's day, anderson blocked the road with her patrol car to hinder the escape of a man who crashed through a checkpoint. little did she know at that time that the man was a suspect in an earlier shooting that wounded four people. the suspect shot at her while she was still blocking the road with her patrol car and she was fatally wounded. mr. speaker, national park ranger margaret anderson made the ultimate sacrifice in the line of duty. i urge passage of this bill to honor her on behalf of all of our colleagues in the house, especially the washington dedication. and this -- passage of this bill is dedicated to her family and to the united states park service. i urge passage of h.r.
the united states and pakistan, one area in which our national interests continue to align, continue to align, is defeating the terrorists on pakistan soil that threaten both of us. we remain committed to pursuing defense cooperation based on these shared interests. thirdly, we must prevent the emergens of new safe havens for al qaeda elsewhere in the world that could be used to attack the united states or our interests. the last decade of war has shown that coordinated efforts to share intelligence, to conduct operations with partners are critical to making sure that al qaeda has no place to hide. we will expand these efforts, including through support and partnership with governments in transition in the middle east and north africa. this campaign against al qaeda will largely take place outside declared combat zones using a small footprint approach that includes precision operations, partnered activities with foreign, special forces operations and capacity- building so that partner countries can be more effective in combating terrorism on their own. wherever possible, we will work through
in the bilateral relationship between the united states and pakistan, one area in which our national interests continue to align, continue to align, is defeating the terrorists on pakistan's soil that threaten both of us. we remain committed to pursuing defense cooperation based on these shared interests. thirdly, we must prevent the emergence of new safe havens for al qaeda elsewhere in the world that could be used to attack the united states or our interests. the last decade of war has shown that coordinated efforts to share intelligence, to conduct operations with partners, are critical to making sure that al qaeda has no place to hide. we will expand these efforts, including, through support and partnership with governments in transition in the middle east and north africa. this campaign against al qaeda will largely take place outside declared combat zones. using a small footprint approach that includes precision partnered activities with foreign special forces operations and capacity building so that partner countries can be more effective in combating terrorism on their own. wherever po
. [captioning made possible by the national captioning institute, inc., in cooperation with the united states house of representatives. any use of the closed-captioned coverage of the house proceedings for political or commercial purposes is expressly prohibited by the u.s. house of representatives.] the speaker pro tempore: on in vote, the yeas are 397, the nays are four. 2/3 being in the affirmative, without objection the motion to reconsider is laid on the table. the speaker pro tempore: the house will be in order. the house will be in order. if you have conversations, i would suggest you take them outside. the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentleman from mississippi, mr. palazzo seek recognition? for what purpose? mr. palazzo: address the house for one minute and revise and extend my remarks. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. recognized for one minute. let me see if we can quiet it down a bit. if you have conversations, please take them somewhere else other than the chamber. mr. palazzo: it is an honor to stand before you to recognize chairman hall and his work
review and smaller units and not have such a large interlinked bread where they are transmitted thousands of miles. host: profits are up, why does the private sector expect taxpayers to foot the bill -- she writes -- nationalize it. guest: the reality is that we do not need taxpayers to modernize the grid, the electricity industry has become the lowest of all industries in terms of reinvesting for research and development and new infrastructure on an annualized basis. i do not know if anyone heard the advertisement that the railroad industry is running. they said we were going to spend $23 million in reinvesting the freight railroad for the future. i started thinking about that. the freight railroad industry is much smaller than the electricity industry. utilities spend about $10 billion in reinvestment. we need a regulatory initiative to allow the utilities to recover the investments that they make in bonafide, long-term investments to the grid. yes, they will have to pay, but i think of what we've discovered with hurricane sandy is that consumers and taxpayers are going to pay through t
to invest in our nation's infrastructure can cause the united states $129 billion a year and over the next 10 years. u.s. businesses would pay $430 billion in transportation costs, household incomes will fall by 7000, and exports will fall by $28 billion. meanwhile, we are falling behind in the global economy. china invests 9% in gross domestic product and infrastructure. here in america, we spend less than 2% of gdp on infrastructure. it is constant bipartisan support that can help close these gaps, restored bridges and water systems. we can do something about telecommunications across this nation, allowing us to build a twenty first century infrastructure. it can work to create jobs all across america. well paying jobs that can't be outsourced. we are once again making things in america, and this is a great nation that has been built on bricks and mortar and fiber optics. we have got to get back to doing that again. we do not have the time or the luxury to play little games. we did pass job legislation right now including an infrastructure by, when that will create jobs, spur investment,
report, failing to invest in our nation 's infrastructure could cost the united states $129 billion a year and over the next 10 years. it reads, u.s. businesses added $430 billion in transportation costs. u.s. exports will fall. meanwhile, we are falling behind in the global economy. china invests 9% of their gross domestic product in infrastructure. india, 5% and rising. in america, we spend less than 2% of gdp on infrastructure. it is a concept with broad and bipartisan support. it could help close the gaps. do something about bringing tele-communications across this nation. it could work to create jobs all across america. good jobs. that cannot be outsourced so we are once again making things in america, becoming more competitive in the global economy. this is a great nation. has been built on brick and mortar and fiber-optic spirit we have got to get back to doing that again. millions of families are struggling -- struggling right now. we need to pass jobs legislation right now, including an infrastructure bank. i was pleased to see the president spoke about an infrastructure ba
and around the nation took due note that something big was happening in texas. the new york times reported that president love it had attracted an array of the learning such as had seldom been assembled in the united states. another paper waxed mystically and observed that the president's speech coincided with the early evening appearance of both jupiter and venus and suggested that the evening sky was an all glory of a bright future for the institute. not every newspaper was as perceptive or trance jed -- transcended. one local journal reported the founding of rice in the same column that the news that congo, the largest circus elephant, was coming to town. as i said i will keep my remarks a great great great deal shorter, but i would like to close with a personal word of congratulations to the president on having the privilege to serve at rice during its centennial. i am delighted to have the opportunity to call him president once again. any of you who have been to supreme court note that the justices on that court are used to asking lawyers a lot of question period today we will turn th
, the campaign to fix the national debt. and a petition filed by residents to secede from the united states. washington journal, with your phone calls, tweets, and e- mail's. >> we can remember barack obama's speech in 2004, the dazzling masterpiece that instantly makes him a national figure and four years later, the most honorable candidate for the presidency. lincoln is a dazzling speech in new york, it is a beautiful testament to the quality of his mind, the research he does, the logical argument. when he runs for the set that, barack obama gave the speech in 2004 running for the senate in illinois. abraham lincoln ran for the senate in illinois and he lost. if you want to think about abraham lincoln in 1860, think about barack obama running for the presidency in 2008. if he had lost the senate election, that is the level of national maturity we are talking about here. >> profiling historic and modern leaders to show the lessons that can be learned from those that have had the greatest impact on the issues of their time. sunday at 9:00 p.m. and midnight eastern part of the holiday weeken
] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2012] >> on 16 or 17 bases in the united states we have military- run schools. the average cost to educate a job in that school per year is $50,000. -- to educate a child in that school. almost four times what the rest of public education costs. and the vast majority of our bases, we use public schools. we could take the money we are spending today and pay every public school system $14,000 per child and save billions of dollars per year. and with the same or better outcomes. >> this weekend you can talk with oklahoma senator tom coburn about the fiscal cliff, affordable care act and the future of the republican party on book tv's "in-depth." the senator has written several books and reports. join the three-hour conversation with your calls, e-mail, tweets and facebook, it's for medical doctor, author and senator tom coburn on book tv's "in-depth." on c-span2. >> coming up today on c-span, live from capitol hill with "washington journal." 11:30 a.m., senate assistant majority leader dick durbin talks about the efforts to resolve the so-cal
.o.t., in comparison, in 1958 through 2012, the united states has invested $1.4 trillion in our nation's highways, $538 billion in aviation, $266 billion in transit, and yet amtrak, which was created in 1971, has received a small fraction of that funding at $41 billion. when you consider that and compare it to the oil and gas industry, which received $441 billion in federal subsidies, although more than half of those have been available to the energy sector. we have spent to bring that together, we spent more in one year with the oil and gas and energy companies and their industry than we have spent in the entire life of the program of amtrak. clearly there seems to be an imbalance and it's not one that should be continued. regarding the vision of high speed rail, the amtrak excela service is one of those alternatives and know it may only achieve the speeds of average of 83 miles per hour, along the n.e.c., surely that is significantly better than the long delays in crawling engagor interstate systems that we have. this committee should continue the role as it always has to facilitate the development o
to fix the national debt. then in the depositions to secede from the united states. we are joined by a georgetown university law professor. washington journal, live starting at 7:00 a.m. eastern on c-span. but what soldiers now placed on century duty on the road in and out of boston and on guard outside the homes, officials and with british artillery now aimed at the town house of the general court, it is easy to understand why many boston residents felt threatened by the occupation. many he is how some soldiers try to stir up racial tensions in their town. not everyone in boston is white. for instance, with an -- within a month and there are rival, three british officers had been discovered encouraging some african american slaves in boston to attack their white masters. one of the stock officers assured these black bostonians that the soldiers were there to procure their freedom and that with their help and assistance, we should be able to drive all the liberty bowl is to the devil. while that slaves he talked to ignore these lies, the british army was not there to free the slav
successfully at the sub national level. governments in the united states, governments in china that want to attract investment, often more than their national governments want to encourage it. perhaps we can use leverage to improve ipr performance at the regional level in china. i see real possibilities there. >> please join me in thinking this terrific panel. [applause] >> join us tonight for a look at the evolution of facebook with chris cox. he advises clarke ceo zucker byrd and talks about development -- ceo zuckerberg and talks about development. tomorrow on "washington journa l," cybersecurity threats. we're joined by a former navy seal and member of the council on foreign relations. that is followed by a look at labor unions. our guest is randi weingarten, president of the american federation of teachers. and then later we will discuss drone strategy. "washington journal" live at 7:00 a.m. eastern on c-span. >> this week on "newsmakers," mary kay henry talks about what unions like the seiu are looking for. tomorow at 10:00 am and 6:00 p.m. eastern. >> what about if the soviet unio
used increasingly by law enforcement officials in the united states. host: mike lyons is a national security analyst. he served in the army and finished his career as executive officer to the deputy chief of staff for operations in the netherlands >>. leah is the next caller. caller: week received a grant money so the police could learn to do surveillance. they are coming into the neighborhoods. they are bringing the drones close to the roof levels banging the roofs causing sleep deprivation. there is no oversight. homeland security never set the committee a up. there is also a problem with health. when you use electromagnetic close to a person, it changes the charge of the cells that causes disease. host: what about the possible health impacts? guest: if you listened to any of the cable networks during the fighting in gaza over the past weeks, you heard that the sound of the unmanned vehicles. it is designed to be used positively to look at traffic patterns. it is designed to be used in ways to help the community. in fact, the crash. they create noise. those things are not consider
to bring that forward. the diplomatic industrial and economic pieces of strategy of united states and for other countries are parts that are used to put forth those pieces that are best for those nations. however, there are some governments that do not and will not adhere to those things in the interest of the united states. if that is the case, we have to have places where we can bring troops into at a moment's notice or in a short period of time and ordered to be able to, when necessary, put forth military pace. host: you would be against the drawing down some of these bases around the world? caller: i agree that some of them are unnecessary. the military has taken that into account but i am listening to the ones she is talking about and i think that is not exactly the majority. host: which ones in particular are you concerned about with regard to countries? caller: places like japan. the base in germany, i could probably agree with that. in japan, you have a force of their in north korea. north korea is not a force that people should take lightly. guest: thank you, i think ther
to get into today and talk a little bit about are the strategic economic choices facing the nation. what does that mean? we talk about strategy and economics, is there something more fundamental about the way the united states is positioned in the world and its choices? michael has his own followers and accolades. jeff bingaman and i and our whole staff were riveted from much of his staff and guidance at the time. had he moved in along some of the issues we're talking about back then, the united states might not be in the same position. to his left, we have the smart guy who would have evolved from a would have come in that we could have seen as national security adviser. his deputy secretary the treasury under bush. he is a senior foreign policy ambassador to adjourn year -- germany and one of the few people who synthesizes the economic and the national security in such a holistic way. his dad was a famous democrat and was one of the reasons i moved to washington. to michael's right, we have doug holtz-eakin. he ran the congressional budget office and he is a very distinguished economis
the united states space program. representative hall has been an especially strong voice for our nation's human space flight program which has benefited not only tbs and florida but propoled our nation on the path of unprecedented scientific and technological advancement. we can all learn a lot from our colleagues. congressman hall leads by example. he's well known for calling a spade a spade. his word truly is his bond and you can always take that to the bank. advancing our nation's human space flight program has been a hallmark for chairman hall. as we look out at america's next general riggs of explorers, space is their destiny and he'll help ensure that they reach it. ralph, there's a lot of work to do and i'm truly honored by the opportunity to serve with you an get it done. i only hope and pray when i'm 65 years old that bill in half as good shape or half as active as you. mr. smith: i yield to minutes to the gentleman from texas, quico canseco. mr. canseco: i thank my friend and colleague for yielding to me. i rise to honor a great man, a great texan, and a great american, ralph
free market economics you want talent and youth coming to this country. if you're a national security conservative, why is the united states going to run the world or be very important and powerful in the world in 100 years and japan isn't? because one, they forget to have kids and they don't do immigration. china, same thing. and europe the same thing. immigration is our competitive advantage against the rest of the world as an economic power, a military power. >> so what other wounds would you look at? >> that's one piece. i think we need to look at -- and our candidates. we ran a candidate, rahmny, who was a great guy much he's not what the 86% of obama's ads said about him. but how do you make the case of how rahmny would govern when he was governor of massachusetts for four years, pre-tea party. >> let's stipulate rahmny was a bad candidate. how would you get a better one? >> there are 30 republican governors. 24 of them have republican legislatures which is what rahmny didn't have. he had 83% democratic legislature. he was a goaly. they just shot goals on him for four years and
, and when you go around the world before 9-11, and you ask what they thought of the united , they admire the united states. they looked at the united states as the plays that could pull a rabbit out of i have and reinvent itself. they see a nation constrained , we talked to tim geithner. can you tell other economies what to do? it has been limited. when you look at barack obama's meeting in london when the global economy was on fire, it is interesting. she laid down the gauntlet we are not going to play by the rules. it has been interesting to look at the limits we have influencing a nation like germany. i asked you, do you think america can influence the international system? i would love to see how you see the challenges ahead and put them in a geostrategic all context. >> i think it is as important as a strong military. i think economics is an answer of rebates as important as traditional policy. i think we have moved from an era where rates are the measure of a nation's strength or vulnerability to an era where sovereign interest rates are a measure of strength or vul
policy, is frequently affected by national interest. to the degree that there is a that what happens in the congo is less important to the united states, we don't cover it. we are infinitely more engaged right now in what's happening in syria, but the coverage of what's happening in syria is not bad but i don't know that it's shed a great deal of light and part of the problem is, even there, you were asking about -- i know you began by asking about what's happening in gaza right now and that i what i think of k konk -- coverage of that, i did hear you correctly? >> yes. >> any time israel is involved in a story it, becomes an excruciatingly difficult story for american journalists to cover because there is a -- for the most part -- a natural sympathy in this country, a sense of identity in this country with israelis and many reporters, old friends and colleagues of mine, the late peter jennings, used to, i think, very unfairly be criticized for taking an anti-israeli point of view. it wasn't so much an anti-israeli point of view as that he had spent many years living in the arab worl
nationalize health care has not worked in europe and canada and it will not work here in the united states. guest: i take issue with a couple of points. this is an entitlement society. i am glad my mother was able to get social security and medicare. she earned it and she got it. i'm sure the seniors feel they paid into the system and the earned it. payments are made into the system based on work that individuals do. when they lose their jobs, they get this insurance. they get what they pay for. entitlements.uncommo it enables them to search for jobs. the president passed a remarkable recovery act program. it wasn't as much as he wanted initially. it created or saved millions of jobs and save millions of people from falling into poverty and created the strongest unemployment insurance program the nation has ever had. host: people have paid into the unemployment insurance. "the washington times" talks about extending the benefits for one year. have americans paid in enough to cover the price tag? guest: that is something that can be made up for in future years. compared to some expenditures
important goals, the united states is moving towards the end of the longest sustained armed conflict in the nation's history, and i would also like to take a moment to express my pride in the men and women in uniform who have fought throughout that period, putting their lives on line to protect this country. were it not for their sacrifices, were in not for their willingness to do that, we would not be able to accomplish what we have. thank god they are there. [applause] one thing i found out when i came from the cia to the defense department, i have a lot of great joy is. i have got great weapons, a great ships, great plains, great technologies, but none of that would be worth anything without the good men and women in uniform that serve this country and did it take their lives to protecting this country. that is the real strength of the united states of america. as we transition into this new era, we will have to look at important priorities that will take on a greater urgency, particularly as we looked at the second term of this administration and look at what are the challenges w
barely even noticed it. i mention that because journalism is frequently affected by national interest. to the degree the perception of what happened in the congo is less important than what happens in the united states, we do not cover it. we are engaged by what happens syria, but i do not know if shed a great deal of light. i know you began by asking what is happening in gaza and what i think about that. >> yes. >> any time israel is involved in a story, did becomes excruciatingly -- id becomes excruciatingly difficult to cover, because there is a sense of identity in this country with israelis, and many reporters, old friends and colleagues of mine used to be criticized for taking an anti- israeli point of view. he spent many years living in the arab world and had a sympathetic. of view to arabs. -- point of view to arabs. i think what is happening in gaza right now meets in the definition of tragedy. the israelis cannot be expected to stand by while their cities are rocketed. on the other hand, the idea that the israeli defense forces are equally professional, the number of casualt
performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2012] >> i am proud and honored to introduce two individuals. he is a former staff sergeant of the united states army. he is the first living person to receive the armed forces medal of honor for actions that occurred after the and vietnam war perry dead -- be it now war. the major general was awarded the united states highest military decoration for heroic actions in 1968 during the vietnam war. he served on active duty in the marine corps over 33 years before returning in 1995. his last assignment was in new orleans, louisiana. his decorations include the medal of honor, silver star medal, a bronze star medal, the purple heart, and able accommodation nettle. i now present to you the staff sergeant and the major general. >> the start of this in 2006. jerry served at hotels and conference centers in new york and northern virginia. while serving as general manager as a resort in leesburg, he founded the national medal of honor society. 15 recipients participated. they went on to raise a total of $15
of the nation's most respected judges, legal scholars, lawyers, and policy analysts. the marquee event is tonight's program. the namesake of tonight's lecturer became the youngest associate justice ever to serve on united states supreme court when he was appointed by president madison in 1812. he made a significant mark on american law in his 33 years on the bench, but his greatest contribution is is renowned commentaries on the constitution. justice story a famously and correctly declared "a constitutional government is addressed to the common sense of the people and never was designed for trials of logical skills or visionary speculation." this lecture series celebrates his legacy in the law. prior lectures have been judge robert bork, professor john harrison, judge raymond randolph, and chief justice of the united states court of appeals of the sixth circuit. tonight, we're honored to add a fifth name to that prestigious list as a welcome justice anthony kennedy. justice kennedy received his bachelor of arts degree from stanford university and the london school of economics and his
. -- posttraumatic stress disorder. they want to get involved. they contribute to our nation and communities. what they need more than anything else is a connection. they need an on ramp into society when they return. college, unit, our company. that is what we can do. we cannot do it alone. the va is facing serious challenges. have -- there are almost a million disability claims backlog. folks are waiting to find out if they will get care, if they would get payment, what is next. that can be a burden. these are all solvable problems. the challenge is isolated to the veterans community. these conversations are branching out. you do not have to be a veteran to support the movement. it does not matter who you voted for or how you feel about the war. we can be united and reassured that we do not repeat the mistakes of vietnam. last week there was a high- profile debate on domestic policy. the two presidential candidates that together as americans watched. there was a were you did not hear in that debate -- veteran. veterans was not considered a domestic policy priority. that has to change. in order f
. the pledge allegiance says one nation under god, indivisible, so that the country is indivisible. that is the hope for the country, as a unit. >> we want to remind our viewers we have a special line for people who have signed a petition to secede from the united states. our next call comes from michael and florida. he welcome to the program. are you there? >> i agree with paul. i think we should cut washington and send them adrift. >> what made you want to sign the petition? do really think that could happen? >> i think it can and i think it would be a good thing. we would not be tied up in all of the bureaucratic nonsense. >> would you see florida as becoming its own country? or maybe grouping with other states? >> the latter. host: we had a war over that. caller: we won. host: which way would that be? mike, you still there? we had a war over that and did not turn out too well for the guys trying to secede. be ok thishink it'll time. professor? guest: it is interesting that the states got to get there, and the mind -- may not be contiguous. it might be florida and texas would fo
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